5 Crucial Things to Take Note When Breastfeeding for the First Time

September 1, 2017

I have been breastfeeding since 2012 with my first born son and believe me it was kind of hard in the beginning.

Most especially if you know you get to latch him, how to position the baby for proper latching was a terrible experience for me as a first time mom.


Feeding our babies with milk from our body entails a lot of effort and commitment. Knowing that now, your baby's nutrition will depend also on the food that you will eat. 


During those moments, I was certain that I could easily fail since most moms out there are already adept at breastfeeding. Not only to think that this quite alien to me, I was also adjusting to my healing wounds from my Cesarean Section Operation.


So given the agony of my post CS wounds I also had to cope with days away from my son. In the hospital babies whose moms cannot nurse them immediately (like me) are fed with breast milk from other moms. Yes, that is right. They are not allowed to drink any formula milk for the first days.

If you are a first time mom, you would be faced with these issues as well, I will be sharing some of the breastfeeding lessons I learned, and here are 5 things I consider the most crucial:

1. Nurse your baby within the first few hours of delivery.

Two hours later, many babies will be hard to rouse. It may seem like you're producing very little at first -- maybe just a few drops of colostrum -- but a 1- or 2-day-old baby's stomach is only the size of a marble." --Jenny Thomas, M.D., IBCLC, a pediatrician in Franklin, Wisconsin, and author of Dr. Jen's Guide to Breastfeeding

2. Head to Nipple and Belly to Belly Position


          Believe me this is the most important part to get your baby to latch.

"Make sure that your baby's stomach is touching yours, so she doesn't have to turn her head to latch. And point your nipple at her nose, not at her mouth, so she'll lift her head up, open her mouth wide, and latch on deeply." --Jacobsen

3.  Have your partner in the process.



         Having daddy help you in the process of breastfeeding can make a whole lot of difference "If possible, your partner should be there when you meet with the lactation consultant, both in the hospital and afterward. Dads can be good problem-solvers, and you may find yourself feeling so overwhelmed and sleep-deprived that it will be hard for you to process information." --Jan Ellen Brown, IBCLC, lactation consultant in Charlotte, North Carolina, and coauthor of 25 Things Every Nursing Mother Needs to Know

4.  Avoid Formula Milk in the Beginning



        Always make sure that your baby get the first colostrum from your breast milk. Colostrum is   extremely easy to digest, and is therefore the perfect first food for your baby.  Some tips for storing your breastmilk can help as well. "Even if you're not sure how long you'll breastfeed, go all in while you're in the hospital. Any formula that's not medically necessary can affect your milk supply." --Dr. Jones

5.  Get ready to heal your damaged nipples.



          Believe me, this is very important. I had several wounds from my breasts and it was truly painful at first. I often feared my baby because latch times call for pain times. Prepare for these situation especially if it is your first time. "Use water-based hydrogel pads or apply enough purified lanolin to keep nipples moist between feedings. --Mohrbacher
I know the struggle is real when it comes to breastfeeding. Get your best breast forward and give your child the best things he deserves, like a warm breast milk made with love.


credits: photo by @mrs.sydneyhayes

www.parents.com

Follow me @NANAYKIKAY

© Nanay Kikay.